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Listed under:  Aboriginal languages
Video

Learn a Dhurga greeting

Walawaani! Learn this Dhurga greeting by listening to teacher Kerry Boyenga and the students of St Mary's Primary School in Moruya. Walawaani means "We hope you've had a safe journey here", or "We hope you have a safe journey home". Dhurga is the first language of the NSW far south coast between Wandandean, Braidwood and ...

Audio

Learning Dharug, Aboriginal language of Sydney

Imagine a time when the Aboriginal language Dharug was the official language spoken in the Sydney area. During this audio clip, reflect on how the language was considered almost 'lost', but (and) discover how Richard Green and others are piecing the Dharug language back together. Find out about how it is being taught at ...

Video

Preserving the Badimaya language

The Badimaya language covers areas ranging from Paynes Find, Ninghan Station and Mount Magnet in Western Australia, but the language is in danger of becoming extinct. How important is it to preserve a language? Watch this video to find out the importance of language to identity and culture.

Video

Yaama Ghubhii: Indigenous Connect Song

Watch the students of Moree East Public School as they perform a song that welcomes people to Gamilaroi land in traditional languague. Listen to the words of the song. What are some of the things the students talk about in their song? What sort of instruments can you hear? How would you describe this style of music? Do ...

Video

One English language or many?

Do people around Australia all speak the same English? In this clip, explore the ways that language evolves and consider the impacts that other 'Englishes', such as British English and American English, can have on the way we speak.

Video

Say hello in Dharug

Watch this video to learn how to greet someone in the Dharug language, spoken by the Indigenous people of the Sydney Basin area. How do you say 'hello, how are you?' in Dharug? And what are the words for good and bad? Practise these phrases with Jacinta Tobin and then teach them to a friend or family member.

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1860s Colonial life

No TV. No electricity. No running water. No car. Imagine living on sheep stations in New South Wales in the 1860s.

Video

Count to 10 in Gomeroi

Learn how to count to 10 in Gomeroi! Community cultural leader Matthew Priestley has been teaching students at Moree East Public School how to speak the traditional Gomeroi language. Listen as the students teach you.

Video

The Buyungurra who didn't listen

Listen as Bianca McNeair shares the story of "The Buyungurra who didn't listen". This is a traditional story that Bianca's mother told her when she was growing up. Bianca uses words from the Malgana language, which is spoken in the area around Shark Bay in Western Australia.

Video

Name parts of the body in Dhurga

Watch and listen as students of St Mary's Primary School in Moruya teach you how to name eight body parts in Dhurga. Dhurga is the first language of the NSW far south coast between Wandandean, Braidwood and Wallaga Lake.

Audio

Re-awakening Australian Aboriginal languages

Did you know that before colonisation there were about 250 distinct Aboriginal and Torres Strait lslander languages being spoken across Australia? Today, however, the majority of these languages are endangered. Listen to a number of significant Australians discussing the Aboriginal language situation in Australia today. ...

Video

Preserving Aboriginal languages

Explore some of the challenges facing many Aboriginal languages and how one man is trying to preserve these 'ancient words'. Consider, too, why languages are important.

Video

Welcome to Shelly Beach, Port Lincoln

Watch and listen as local Parnkalla (Barngarla) boys Darnell and Kaiden Richards take you to their special place: Shelly Beach in Port Lincoln, South Australia. Learn some local Parnkalla words as the boys share a story about what connects their family and community to this beach.

Video

Learn to count in Kaurna!

Presenter Taylor Power-Smith helps us learn to count to ten in Kaurna, the Indigenous language of the Kaurna people of Adelaide and the Adelaide Plains. 

Online

GeogSpace: year 3 - exemplar

This is a web page consisting of an overview and two illustrations of practice on the GeogSpace website, a resource for teachers. The illustrations develop the concept of place into a more complex idea with subtleties of function, and contrasts in settlements between different places. Illustration 1 develops students' knowledge ...

Audio

The Awabakal language of the Newcastle area

The Awabakal language, once common in the area now known as Newcastle, was almost 'lost'. It is being brought back to life using old texts and translations left by an early missionary. In this audio clip, listen to a discussion about the importance of reconstructing the Awabakal language and the challenges this poses.

Audio

Teaching Aboriginal languages in schools

Would you like to learn another language? This audio recording features a number of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians discussing both the teaching of Aboriginal languages in schools and the benefits that this teaching offers all Australians.

Video

1860s Colonial life

No TV. No electricity. No running water. No car. Imagine living on sheep stations in New South Wales in the 1860s.

Video

Discover the diversity of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages

Marrin Gamu is a special video created by First Languages Australia to show the diversity and beauty of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages. There are five languages featured in this clip: Kalaw Kawaw Ya, Warrgamay, Nywaygi, Yugambeh and Wiradjuri. Across Australia there are hundreds of traditional ...

Audio

May O'Brien talks about Aboriginal storytelling, 2008

This is an edited sound recording of an interview with Western Australian Aboriginal educator and author May O'Brien. O'Brien says that in her early life she was told Aboriginal stories orally and in drawings in the sand. She says that when she puts Aboriginal stories in writing, she thinks carefully about the words she ...