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Listed under:  Language  >  Language modes  >  Creating texts  >  Literary devices  >  Figures of speech  >  Metaphors
Video

Can We Help?: Word histories: how extraordinary!

Words can change over time and so can their meanings. The word 'extra' broke away from other words to become a word on its own. Professor Kate Burridge explains how this impacts on words like 'extraordinary'. She also explains the origins and meanings of the words 'hearse' and 'rehearse''.

Video

Heywire: Sussing out the similes in a footy game

If you've ever tried to describe an experience to a friend and said, 'It was just like', you were using a simile. Similes and their close pals metaphors are figures of speech that writers of all sorts of texts use. As you listen to this Heywire audio story, explore Taylor Smith's use of them in his recount of a Saturday ...

Video

Can We Help?: Borrowed words: the processes of language change

Do you know any words from another language? Chances are, you know more than you think you do! English is a polyglot language; one that borrows words from other languages. In this Professor Kate Burridge discusses the origins of the phrases 'short-shrift' and 'lily-livered'.

Video

Julius Caesar: Justifying murder

Brutus is in a dilemma! His friend Julius Caesar is about to be crowned Emperor of Rome. However, Brutus is concerned that Caesar will become a tyrant, and he wants to do what is best for Rome. Join interviewer James Evans and actors John Bell and Hazem Shammas from Bell Shakespeare as they explore the language of this ...

Video

How to write fiction that comes alive

This short video for students shares some vividly illustrated tips on how to use language to make your fiction really come alive using metaphors, sensory imagery, onomatopoeia and avoiding cliches.

Online

Snapshot writing lesson - being descriptive by appealing to the senses

Students learn to become more descriptive in their writing by using figurative language and commas to develop a highly visible picture in their readers' heads. They use similes and metaphors to associate an image with a meaning and play on the senses to engage their readers in what they have written.

Video

Julius Caesar: The adder and the ladder

Shakespeare's tragedies provide his audiences with moral dilemmas. Julius Caesar is no exception. In this soliloquy, Brutus ponders whether assassinating Julius Caesar would be in the best interests of Rome. Shakespeare's use of metaphor provides the key to understanding Brutus' motivation, convincingly brought to life ...

Text

Introduction to Shakespeare: The Taming of the Shrew

This resource for students is the second in a series entitled 'Introduction to Shakespeare', based on a study of 'The Taming of the Shrew'. This resource looks at selected scenes, with activities based on each. Students are asked to: translate speeches into modern English; analyse the use of puns to create humour; discuss ...