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Listed under:  Science  >  Life  >  Ecosystems  >  Food webs
Video

Cockles' role in food webs

This is a colour video clip of marine scientist Stephen Wing, from the University of Otago in New Zealand, discussing the role cockles ('Austrovenus stutchburyi') play in marine food webs in New Zealand. (Classification - Phylum: Mollusca; Class: Bivalvia; Order: Veneroida; Family Veneridae.)

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Polar bear survival

Do you know what is threatening the survival of the world's largest land carnivore? Watch this clip of a polar bear as it moves across the Arctic ice, and find out about what is happening in its icy world. The World Wildlife Fund's Margaret Williams explains the feeding habits and adaptations of the polar bear, and identifies ...

Video

The Squid, the Vibrio & the Moon

This resource uses the story of a symbiotic relationship between microscopic bacterium and a small squid and the mutual benefits each provides the other. The text describes a scientific concept in a simple and engaging manner. A video reading (17:15 min) of the book is supported by teacher's notes and student activities ...

Image

A leopard seal on ice

This is a colour photograph of a leopard seal ('Hydrurga leptonyx') lying on an ice floe. The seal is long and sinuous, and has a small head and a dark grey dorsal surface with a lighter grey underbelly. The seal has recently eaten, and blood from its kill can be seen on the ice.

Online

Feeding relationships: Connected Learning Experience (CLE)

In this investigation, students explore and develop models of food chains and food webs to represent and analyse the flow of energy through ecosystems and explore the impact of changing components within these systems.

Video

What have we got here: yabbies

This four and a half minute snapshot video looks at Yingka or outback yabbies. The video explores the feeding requirements and biology of the yabby including its anatomy, colouring, preferred habitat and role in the ecosystem. It also explains how to catch yabbies. The video is one of ten in the series 'What have we got ...

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Downloading data from animal tags

This is a colour photograph of a scientist in a laboratory using a laptop computer to download data from electronic animal tags. To the right of the computer is a specialised communication box into which the electronic tag is placed. The scientist in the image is Dr Miles Lamare, a marine biologist involved in sea star ...

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Marine scientist in the laboratory

This is a colour photograph of marine scientist Dr Miles Lamare. Dr Lamare is in his office at the Portobello Marine Laboratory at the University of Otago, New Zealand. On the desk behind Dr Lamare is the scientific equipment he uses to download data from electronic tags, which he attaches to sea stars.

Video

South Australia's ancient sea fossils

Come on a palaeontologist's dig at Emu Bay, South Australia, and discover some weird-looking creatures frozen in stone. Find out what these fossils tell scientists about life on the ancient sea floor. There is a demonstration of how a fossil is formed, and you'll be surprised by the types of materials that have been preserved.

Video

What have we got here: mistletoe

This five minute snapshot video about the Australian native parasitic mistletoe debunks some myths associated with mistletoe. It explains the role that mistletoe plays in the ecosystem such as attracting birds, providing food for animals, protecting them from predators. The video also covers seed dispersal, germination ...

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Tuna sandwich trophic pyramid

This image is a diagram known as a trophic pyramid. This example shows the levels of an ecosystem that support the growth of tuna, which might be consumed by a human in a tuna sandwich. The diagram shows six levels in the 'pyramid' from phytoplankton through to humans, and visually depicts the size of the biomass at each ...

Interactive

Environmental forensics at sea

The main screen shows a marine environment and research boat against a background of coastal hills and a fiord. There are two entry points for investigation: Phytoplankton clues and Sediment cores, containing five interviews with a scientist explaining how science investigations can be used as a forensic tool to investigate ...

Video

Disease threatens fish

Imagine what would happen if a deadly fish disease found its way into Australia's biggest river system. Watch this clip to learn more about a disease threatening the ecology of the Murray-Darling River. Scientist, Professor Richard Whittington, explains that the disease could be the final straw for an endangered Australian ...

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Waves supply nutrients to marine ecosystems

Dive through the marine kelp forests off Australia's western coast and discover how ocean waves help cycle nutrients to sustain the plants and kelp forests of marine ecosystems.

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Controlling pests without chemicals

What options do farmers have to control pests? Find out how vegetable grower Mark Cable teamed up with horticultural scientist Paul Horns to develop a new approach to controlling pests. Discover the unusual allies they enlisted.

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Tagging the great white shark

Great white shark sightings off the Australian coastline create a lot of interest and debate. Would it help if we had a way of knowing where these sharks are? In this clip, hear from shark biologist Dr Rachel Robbins, who discusses acoustic (sound)tagging technology. Discover some of the issues of using this technology ...

Video

Feeding sheep on native fodder

Find out how Western Australian farmer Don Nairn, with a bit of help from CSIRO scientist Dr Dean Revell, is protecting his farmland from wind erosion and at the same time gaining a new kind of food for his sheep.

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Curbing the carp population

Find out why European carp fish are called 'river rabbits' in Australia. Listen to how they came to Australia and what makes them such a pest now.Discover how a local entrepreneur is exploiting the new resource while scientists are doing their best to cap the carp population explosion.

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Marine trophic pyramid

This image displays a type of diagram known as a trophic (or ecological) pyramid. This example depicts the organisms and the matter and energy flows in a typical marine ecosystem. The diagram shows six levels of organisms from primary producers through to the top carnivores, arranged in a pyramid. Also represented is the ...

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Indigenous Science: shell middens and fish traps

This is an article about Aboriginal shell middens along the Queensland coast and the information they provide about Aboriginal food collection practices. Written by Kudjala/Kalkadoon Elder from Queensland Letitia Murgha and intended mainly for teachers, it describes how shell middens were created over thousands of years ...