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Yulunga: kandomarngutta

In some parts of Australia children were allowed to use the bullroarer (whirlers), or small versions of it, as a source of amusement. In other areas the bullroarer had a special significance and was not used as a ‘toy’. In parts of Victoria a bullroarer called the kandomarngutta was used. This was a thin piece of wood, ...

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Yulunga: walbiri

A memory-testing game was played by the Walbiri children of central Australia. Players were required to recall sand-drawing maps of the locality after watching for a short time. This was a game that helped the children remember and identify the surrounding topography. This is a memory-testing game using various objects. ...

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Yulunga: birray

Young children in the Bloomfield area of north Queensland played the game of birray (march-fly). It was observed by Walter Roth in the early 1900s. This is a game where a chaser (birray) attempts to tag (touch) other players. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with ...

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Yulunga: tambil tambil

In many areas of Australia people played skills practice games, where they threw objects at each other. These included sticks, mud and stones of various sizes. A spear-dodging game called tambil tambil (refers to the blunt spears used) was played by the Jagara (Jagera) people of the Brisbane area, as part of sham fights ...

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Yulunga: buroinjin

This was a ball game played by the Kabi Kabi people of south Queensland. The game was played with a ball made of kangaroo skin, which was called a buroinjin. The ball, which was smaller than a soccer ball, was sewn with tendons and stuffed with grass. Teams from different groups played against each other. The game was often ...

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Yulunga: arrkene irreme

The boys of the Aranda and Luridja of central Australia played a hitting game. A small cylindrical stick, sharpened at each end, was laid on the ground. A longer stick was held in one hand. The player hit one end of the stick to make it bounce into the air and as it rose it was hit with considerable force. A hitting and ...

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Yulunga: kutturi

Small digging sticks were made for children in many parts of Australia. These were considered to be personal property and were usually well looked after. They were often used in play. In some areas the women would use digging sticks in play ‘fights’. This activity was reported from an unidentified place as a stick-practice ...

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Ben Chifley, prime minister 1945-49

This is a black-and-white photograph of Ben Chifley, Australia's sixteenth prime minister. It shows him looking down towards the camera while holding his pipe.

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Yulunga: wulijini

This hand-hitting or handball game was played with a zamia (Cycas media) seed by the people of Bathurst Island in northern Australia. In the Meda district of northwest Australia players hit flat pieces of wood. This is a ball-hitting game. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians ...

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Yulunga: brambahl

A favourite game of the old men of the Juwalarai people of the Narran River in New South Wales was brambahl (skipping). Men of more than 70 years were often the best. This is a skipping game where players perform various actions. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians ...

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Yulunga: Munhanganing

The game of Munhanganing was played by children of the Arnhem Land area in northern Australia. Children played this, and other running games, in the flickering lights from firebrands of the grownups, sitting about a camp site. A running-and-chasing team game in which players attempt to touch players on the opposing team. ...

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Yulunga: weme

The Walbiri people of central Australia played a stone-bowling game. One player rolled a stone, which was used as a target by the second player. In the traditional game players alternated turns, with each one aiming at the other’s stone. This is a bowling game in which balls are rolled underarm along the ground to knock ...

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Yulunga: kalkadoon kee'an

In areas of north Queensland, a game of throwing skill was played. A large bone, such as an emu shinbone (with twine attached to it) was thrown over a net (used to catch emus) into a pit or hole. Considering the distance to the hole, great skill was required to correctly aim the bone and ensure that it did not touch the ...

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Tokyo modern I: Koizumi Kishio's '100 views' of the imperial capital, 1928-40

This is a collection of online materials about the rebirth of Tokyo in the years following the Great Kanto earthquake of 1923. The collection focuses on a series of 100 woodblock prints produced between 1928 and 1940 by artist Koizumi Kishio. The online materials include an essay by James Ulak that contains: its own links ...

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George Reid, prime minister 1904-05

This is a black-and-white photograph of George Reid, Australia's fourth prime minister, which introduces a range of online material about his life and career. The photograph is an official portrait. It shows him wearing a white shirt with a white tie and vest. He is looking away from the camera.

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Yulunga: aurukun

This game comes from the Aurukun Aboriginal community in north Queensland, where it is known as ‘bat and ball’. It is a modern game that has links to traditional hitting games of Aboriginal people in the area. It is the most popular of all the games played at Aurukun and can usually be seen being played at lunch time in ...

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Yulunga: yongar ngardongin

The emu and kangaroo dance (play) games among the Bibbuluk kening (Bibbulum people’s dances) were performed in Western Australia in the Vasse, Augusta, Bunbury, Murray and Swan districts and probably further north and east. The game was called yongar ngardongin by the Vasse district people. Almost all large animal and bird ...

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John Thomson's China I: illustrations of China and its people, photo albums, 1873-74 - essay by Allen Hockley

This is a collection of online materials focusing on the photographs taken by Scottish photographer John Thomson (1837-1921) during his travels throughout China from 1868 to 1872. The materials centre on a richly illustrated essay by Allen Hockley about Thomson and his views of China. Linked to various sections of the essay ...

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Yulunga: battendi

A spear game was played by Aboriginal people in the Lake Murray, Lake Alexandrina and Lake Albert areas of southern Australia. A prize such as a newly made shield was offered to the winner. The contest was in two parts: distance throwing and target throwing. This is a distance-and-accuracy throwing contest using a woomera ...

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Yulunga: Garumba

Teams from far and wide gathered at a ‘place of wrestling’ (at Dingulami) in Kabi Kabi territory in south Queensland each year at the time when the bunya nuts were ready. Tingalpa near Brisbane was also a wrestling place. Only one team represented each group attending. Two players came from each totem of a group. Each pair ...