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Cybercrime and the law

This sequence of six lesson ideas focuses on the concept that community e-safety and wellbeing is enhanced when individuals understand the behaviours, rules and laws associated with being a digital citizen and take action to prevent cybercrime. This resource provides students with the opportunity to explore how Australia’s ...

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Lunch Box Blitz: build a healthy lunch box

This website provides resources for teachers, parents and students promoting student health and well-being including lesson plans, student resources including posters, recipes and activities. The resources can be downloaded and easily reproduced for classroom use. The website also provides parent information licensed for ...

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Yulunga: wingara

A guessing game played by Aboriginal children in the areas around Newcastle in New South Wales was described. Using the kernel of a wild plum the children drew a picture of a fish or animal. This was concealed in a closed hand and the group sat around and attempted to guess what was represented on it. When the drawing was ...

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Yulunga: pucho-pucho tau-i-malle

This stone rolling and stopping game was originally described as ‘stick-and-stone’ and was played by men in the Boulia district of Queensland. The Pitta-Pitta people referred to it as pucho-pucho tau-i-malle. This is a ball rolling and stopping activity involving two groups of players. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous ...

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Yulunga: julba

Skipping with a vine was popular with the Jagara (or Jagera) people of Brisbane and surrounding areas. The game outlined below was based on a 1950s account by an elder named Gaiarbu. To play this skipping game successfully, the players needed to be very active and had to have plenty of practice. This is a skipping game ...

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Yulunga: buran

A game of accuracy, the throwing of the boomerang (buran) was played by the Jagara (or Jagera) people of south Queensland. A player stood in the middle of the small circle and threw a right-hand boomerang (dunimgi) first. The aim was to make it return as close as possible to the peg (marker) in the middle of the circle. ...

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Yulunga: purlja

This was a popular and enjoyable ball game of the Walbiri people of central Australia and was usually played in spring. A purlja (ball) was made of hair-string with the inside containing crumbled pith — the stems and leaves of small soft plants and shrubs. The game was played by males who had reached puberty. Two teams ...

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Yulunga: turi turi

In the northwest-central area of Queensland, the Maidhargari children made a type of skippingrope (turi turi) from the long roots of the Bauhinia (Queensland bean tree), or white-gum, which grew near the water’s edge. A vine rope was used in the same way by Wogadj children on the Daly River in the Northern Territory. This ...

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Yulunga: tabud nuri

A game of tag observed being played on Mabuiag Island in the Torres Strait by Margaret Lawrie. It is a group activity that is suitable for younger players. Players in a line coil and uncoil like a snake before a player is chased by other players, who attempt to touch (catch) him or her. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous ...

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Yulunga: dhandang

Tree-climbing activities and climbing contests were widespread and helped to develop a skill of practical use. There were a variety of methods of climbing trees used in different parts of Australia. Some of these involved the use of vines or notches cut into trees. The Victoria River people in the Northern Territory arranged ...

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Yulunga: nandrra-rna

A small number of ‘marble’ type games (either traditional or introduced) were played in various parts of Australia. Gugada boys, living near Tarcoola in South Australia, used wooden marbles. The marbles placed in the ring were called kooka (meat) and the shooting marble was called kodji (spear). In the 1940s on Mer Island, ...

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Yulunga: wabbyn

The Injibandi people of Western Australia had many guessing games. Wabbagunja kambong, wabbyn, ngabbungee jenarnung, kambugenjin were some of the names of their guessing games. Guessing games were often played around the campfire after the day’s hunting was over. Women might also play these guessing games among themselves ...

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Yulunga: Gitja

The Gitga (moon) play game from the north Queensland area was usually played when a number of children gathered together. The full version of the game observed involved imitation and acting aspects along with a running-and-chasing activity. This is a chasing-and-catching (tag) game. It is a simplified version of a more ...

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Yulunga: woggabaliri

Aboriginal people in places such as the Bogan and Lachlan River areas of New South Wales played ball games with a ball made of possum fur. This was usually spun by the women and made into a ball about five centimetres or more in diameter. The various types of games required great agility and suppleness of limbs to play ...

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Yulunga: sanbaing

In parts of Papua New Guinea and the Torres Strait Islands players of both genders were observed playing a game of sand-ball throwing. It required a great deal of expertise to perform successfully and was often played all day. Players make ‘bombs’ out of sand and throw (lob) them into the water. The Yulunga: Traditional ...

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Yulunga: pulyugge

Keep-away types of ball games were played in many parts of Australia. Pulyugge was played between selected teams of different groups in the Murray, Lake Alexandria and Lake Albert areas of South Australia. A running, passing and ball-catching game of team keep-away. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was ...

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Yulunga: wadai

In the 1890s, children in parts of the Torres Strait were observed playing a ball-catching game in the water called udai (wadai) or doamadiai. This is a throwing-and-catching game in which players compete for possession of a ball. The versions outlined here use the original water game (udai) and adapt it for use on land. ...

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Yulunga: murrumbidgee

In 1834, boys on the banks of the Murrumbidgee were observed amusing themselves by throwing stones into the deep part of the stream and diving in order to catch them before they reached the bottom — usually successfully. There was much amusement associated with their competition. This is a swimming-and-diving game where ...

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Yulunga: puloga

Regular mock combat tournaments took place in the Cardwell and Tully River areas of north Queensland. The Mallanpara people called this a prun. It was essentially an entertainment activity, though the opportunity was taken to settle disputes, real or imaginary. It also gave the men a chance to show off their prowess and ...

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Yulunga: kaidu babu

This is a popular water game that was observed being played at Mabuiag Island in the Torres Strait region, by Margaret Lawrie in the 1960s. This is an underwater swimming game. The object of the game is to see who can swim the longest distance underwater. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed ...