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Listed under:  Grammar
Video

Challenging grammar rules, darlings and crowbars

Find out that what appears to be a straightforward grammar rule behind the use of the words 'fewer' and 'less' may not be as straightforward as it seems! Professor Kate Burridge explains that this grammar rule has been under challenge for centuries. She also explains the origins of the word 'darling' and why the 'crow' ...

Interactive

Laptop wrap – putting the apostrophe in its place

This resource focuses on how to use apostrophes correctly, with information, links and activities. This resource supports the Australian Curriculum in English K–10.

Interactive

Putting speech marks in their place

This resource focuses on how to use speech marks correctly, with information, links and activities. This resource supports the Australian Curriculum in English K–10.

Interactive

When do I use a colon?

This resource focuses on how to use colons correctly, with information, links and activities. This resource supports the Australian Curriculum in English K–10.

Interactive

When do I use a semicolon?

This resource focuses on how to use semicolons correctly, with information, links and activities. This resource supports the Australian Curriculum in English K–10.

Interactive

Putting the comma in its place

This resource focuses on how to use commas correctly, with information, links and activities. This resource supports the Australian Curriculum in English K–10.

Interactive

How to use indirect speech

This resource focuses on how to use indirect speech correctly, with information, links and activities. This resource supports the Australian Curriculum in English K–10.

Video

Gardening verbs

Do you garden? The word 'garden' is both a noun and a verb. What other words in this video are both a noun and a verb? Can you think of some more gardening verbs?

Video

Cleaning verbs

When you tell someone you're cleaning, you're giving them a general idea of what you're doing. Some of the verbs mentioned in this video are more specific and can help you describe what you're doing in more detail. What are some other verbs that describe more generally what you are doing, and what are some verbs that can ...

Video

Cooking verbs

Verbs used to describe different actions while cooking are many and varied. Learn some of them in this short Australia Plus video. What do you think is the difference between 'chop' and 'cut' and 'dice'?

Video

How misused modifiers can hurt your writing

A short video for secondary students which explains what modifiers are, and how it's important to clearly link them to the words they're actually referring to, in order to avoid unintentional ambiguity.

Video

When to use 'me', 'myself' and 'I'.

This short video for secondary students explains the different roles in a sentence that 'me', 'I' and 'myself' play, and where each belongs.

Interactive

Syllabus bites: types of sentences

A web page resource with information, teacher guides and activities on types of sentences to support the Australian Curriculum in English K–10. It has detailed activities, links to resources and quizzes.

Video

'Bought' or 'brought' and radio code

Changes in the use, pronunciation, and meaning of common everyday English words happen all the time. Professor Kate Burridge explains that we can see this in the way people increasingly switch the past tense of the verbs 'buy' and 'bring'. She also answers a viewer's question about why 'Roger' is used on two-way and CB radios.

Video

English: an evolving language

In this clip, explore two viewpoints about the use of the English language, particularly in regards to punctuation. Should English remain a static language or is there room for a more flexible view of the 'rules' of English language?

Interactive

My day: Li: level 1

Help Li by selecting the best texts for different parts of his day. Choose the correct text in a range of activities such as helping Li make up his mind about which bus to take to school, and what to choose for a healthy lunch from the menu. This learning object is one in a series of six objects.

Video

Got or gotten? What a nightmare!

Words have a history. Knowing their history helps us to understand what they mean and why some people use them in different ways. Professor Kate Burridge explains how the use of the past tense of the verb 'get' (gotten) has changed, but is still in use by many people. She also discusses the history of the word 'nightmare'.

Video

Why do we say the words the way we do?

What kinds of things might influence the way we pronounce words in English? Professor Kate Burridge explains why knowing when 'kilometre' came into English helps us to understand why it is pronounced differently from similar words such as 'kilogram' and 'centimetre'. She also explains what it means to 'barrack' for a team.

Video

Words and sayings over time

Have you ever wondered where sayings like 'hanging by the skin of your teeth' come from? Professor Kate Burridge explains the origin and meaning of this saying. She also explains the opposite word (antonym) to 'misogynist' (someone who hates or has a long and deep prejudice against women) and the origins of the word 'goodbye'.

Video

From possessive apostrophes to discombobulation!

People often worry about the use of apostrophes. See how Professor Kate Burridge answers a question about how to use the apostrophes after certain names, telling us how the rule has changed over time. She also explains the origins of the word 'discombobulate' and why the plural of house is not 'hice'.