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Listed under:  Science  >  Universe
Video

The Milky Way

What do you know about the Milky Way? Did you know that there are hundreds of billions of stars in it? Before you embark on your stargazing expedition, watch this video to learn how you can use just your hands and a compass to locate stars in the sky! What is the unit of measurement used when you're measuring distances ...

Video

The biggest radio telescope in the world

In the past, astronomers explored the universe with their eyes and optical telescopes, but what they could see was limited. Find out how radio telescopes have revolutionised the way astronomers 'see' the universe, allowing us to explore deeper into space than ever before.Watch this clip to learn about Australia's contribution ...

Video

Square Kilometre Array (SKA), 2011

Find out about Australia's super science project - the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Listen to astronomy experts discuss Australia's bid to be the home of the world's first SKA (telescope). See the telescope Australian scientists built to demonstrate their technological capabilities and help secure the bid. Find out what ...

Video

Gamma rays and space balloons

Have you ever wondered how scientists know so much about the universe when it's too far away to see and no one has ever been there? It's not just by using telescopes based on Earth. Watch as an international team of astrophysicists and engineers attempt to launch a balloon high into the atmosphere, loaded with expensive ...

Video

Birth of radio astronomy

Did you know that some of the most ground-breaking scientific discoveries were made by chance (serendipity)? Discover the link between static on a telephone line and the invention of the radio telescope that has helped scientists find new clues to the origin of the universe.

Audio

Parkes telescope

The Parkes telescope, is a large radio telescope located in Parkes, New South Wales. It has played a role in assisting international space missions including Apollo 11. This audio clip features Neil Armstrong describing his first step on to the moon. Listen to the benefits of linking radio telescopes into an array.

Interactive

Night Sky Quiz

This is a ten question multiple choice quiz that gives students feedback on their understanding of about the nature of the night sky and the universe. A useful resource to determine what students already know or to promote discussion. Feedback provides some excellent explanations.

Audio

Music and the cosmos

This is a one hour audio of 'Music and the Cosmos', a University of Sydney celebration of the 2009 International Year of Astronomy. Hear how violent, chaotic and dangerous the universe is away from the comforts of planet Earth. When stars like our Sun some to the end of their lives, they explode in a catastrophic event ...

Video

SKA to help unlock the secrets of the universe

Radio astronomy is on the verge of developing groundbreaking technology that will allow scientists to see into the furthest reaches of the universe. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the most powerful radio telescope ever built. See how it has been designed and the developments that have been made so far.

Video

Aboriginal astronomy

Many ancient cultures studied the night sky, and we know this because it is reflected in some of the earliest stories we have on record. Learn about one of these stories in this video. Other than the Dreamtime stories, what other evidence might there be that the Aboriginal people studied the stars?

Video

Light takes time to travel through space

Light travels in waves and carries information as it moves from one object to another. In this clip, people are used to represent the Sun, planets and light rays in order to show that light takes time to travel through space bringing information from those objects to us on Earth. Discover that by the time we receive this ...

Video

What is a meteor?

Brianna and Professor Jonti Horner look up into the night sky to find out more about shooting stars. What is a shooting star made of and why do they fall from the sky?

Video

Using maths to understand the universe

When completed, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project will be the largest and most capable radio telescope available to scientists. Radio telescopes like the SKA detect radio waves produced by events and objects in the furthest reaches of space, translating these waves into data and imagery that allow scientists to study ...

Video

Chaos in space

How would you describe the universe? One way to describe it would be to call it chaotic. There is constant flux as new stars are born and others disappear. The Big Bang theory posits that all this activity began billions of years ago with a hot 'big bang' as all the matter concentrated in a single point began to expand. ...

Video

Discover some of the mysteries of the universe!

Watch and listen as Dr Graham Phillips explains what has been discovered about our universe in the last decade or so. What did the WMAP satellite study? What did it confirm? The scientists in this story talk about being surprised to find that the universe is expanding at an increasing pace. What do they say is responsible ...

Online

Expansion of the universe: Connected Learning Experience (CLE)

This Connected Learning Experience is designed to investigate Edwin Hubble's observations as evidence for the Big Bang theory. In 1929, Hubble discovered that the light from distant galaxies was 'red shifted' and that the further a galaxy is form Earth, the faster it is moving away. This was evidence for the expansion of ...