Close message Scootle will be undergoing maintenance between 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm today, 25 November 2021. You may experience intermittent connection at this time.

Teacher guide Tokyo modern I: Koizumi Kishio's '100 views' of the imperial capital, 1928-40

TLF ID M006709

This is a collection of online materials about the rebirth of Tokyo in the years following the Great Kanto earthquake of 1923. The collection focuses on a series of 100 woodblock prints produced between 1928 and 1940 by artist Koizumi Kishio. The online materials include an essay by James Ulak that contains: its own links to other related materials; 18 visual narratives or pathways of related prints through Tokyo of the period; and a visual narrative that shows prints of 18 sites in Tokyo complete with written descriptions of the sites and translations of Koizumi's own annotations.



Educational details

Educational value
  • This is a rich collection of primary and secondary sources showing the 'new Tokyo' that was reconstructed as a modern metropolis after the devastating Great Kanto earthquake of 1923 and then largely vanished in the Allied bombing of World War II.
  • The collection is highly significant for modern history in years 11 and 12, particularly for studies of Japan in the period from the 1850s to 1945. The collection provides a guide to Koizumi's body of work, and draws out tensions and undercurrents in his ostensibly modern city, including the pull of the past, the pervasive imperial presence and the growing intrusion of militarism.
  • The collection, especially the first chapter of the essay, is also useful for studies of natural disasters. The Great Kanto earthquake was one of the worst earthquakes in world history. It destroyed Tokyo, Yokohama and their surroundings. About 140,000 people died as a result of the earthquake and the resulting fires.
  • The text of the essay by James Ulak, deputy director of the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, offers a detailed historical and cultural 'reading' of the woodblock prints and the city they portray. As part of his analysis, Ulak highlights four topics: earthquake and aftermath; celebrating place; celebrating rebirth; and modernity's undercurrents.
Year level

9; 10; 11; 12

Learning area
  • The Arts
  • Geography
  • History

Other details

Contributors
  • Author
  • Person: James T. Ulak
  • Description: Author
  • Contributor
  • Name: Education Services Australia
  • Organization: Education Services Australia
  • Description: Data manager
  • Address: VIC, AUSTRALIA
  • URL: http://www.esa.edu.au/
  • Person: James T. Ulak
  • Description: Author
  • Person: Koizumi Kishio
  • Description: Artist
  • Publisher
  • Name: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Description: Publisher
  • Address: Massachusetts, UNITED STATES
  • URL: http://web.mit.edu/
  • Name: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Description: Publisher
  • Address: Massachusetts, UNITED STATES
  • URL: http://web.mit.edu/
  • Resource metadata contributed by
  • Name: Education Services Australia Ltd
  • Organisation: Education Services Australia Ltd
  • Address: AUSTRALIA
  • URL: www.esa.edu.au
Access profile
  • Generic
Learning Resource Type
  • Online
Rights
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology © 2008 Visualizing Cultures. Creative Commons-Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0.