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Listed under:  Mathematics  >  Sampling (Statistics)
Interactive

The slushy sludger: questions

Use a vending machine to squirt coloured 'slushies' into ice-cream cones. Work out which 'sludge events' are possible and then choose a matching probability word.

Interactive

Spinners: explore

Test a coloured spinner (dial with pointer) with three equal-sized sectors. Use a tool to build more spinners. Choose up to twelve equal-sized sectors. Choose one of three colours for each part of a spinner. For example, make a three-colour spinner with six red sectors, four yellow sectors and two orange sectors. Test the ...

Video

Same birthday: what's the chance?

Mathematician Adam Spencer answers a question about something called the 'birthday paradox'. Find out what this has to do with birthdays and the number of people in a room.

Interactive

The foul food maker: questions 1

Use a vending machine to get an awful meal such as fly soup, worm pasta or yucky duck. The machine serves a meal randomly from four slots. Work out the likelihood of getting each type of meal. Then choose a matching probability word: impossible, unlikely, equal, likely or certain. Run simple probability experiments. Compare ...

Video

Probability and the birthday paradox

Even when a maths problem seems simple – for example, the chance of two people sharing a birthday – the maths can run counter to our human intuition. Mathematician Lily Serna poses a maths problem to the Clovelly Bowling Club: how many people do you need to gather to get a 50 per cent chance of any two people in that group ...

Interactive

Mystery spinner: challenge

Look at results in a frequency graph compiled after testing an unseen spinner. Work out the likely proportions of colours in the mystery spinner. Use a tool to build a new spinner (a dial with a pointer). Choose up to five equal-sized sectors. Fill the sectors with up to five colours. For example, make a five-part spinner ...

Image

Taking ocean samples

This is a colour photograph of marine scientist Dr Candida Savage taking samples from the ocean off Stewart Island, New Zealand. In the image, Dr Savage appears to be placing samples into microtubes and placing the microtubes into a microtube storage container. Dr Savage is sitting on a jetty by the ocean.

Interactive

Leisure survey

Explore how kids use their leisure time. Choose questions to ask in a survey. For example, look at the percentages of kids that play tennis, basketball or netball. Examine a table of results. Sort the data and use it to answer questions. Display the results using a suitable type of graph such as a pie chart, bar graph or ...