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Cybercrime and the law

This sequence of six lesson ideas focuses on the concept that community e-safety and wellbeing is enhanced when individuals understand the behaviours, rules and laws associated with being a digital citizen and take action to prevent cybercrime. This resource provides students with the opportunity to explore how Australia’s ...

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Harbour swimming, Manly, 1960

This is a colour photograph depicting young children diving off a special apparatus at Manly Beach. The photograph was taken by Bill Brindle, who worked for the Australian News and Information Bureau. It is part of an online showcase called 'Summers Past'. Information about this particular item can be located in its educational ...

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Yulunga: meetcha boma

A hockey game was played by the Noongar people in the south of Western Australia. The game was called meetcha boma (‘nut striking’) in the Perth area. A meeja or meetcha (red gum nut) was used as the ball and a piece of wood with a crooked root (bandeegurt) as the hockey stick. The stick was generally bent into shape with ...

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Yulunga: wana wana

This is a version of a game played by the young Noongar girls in the southwest of Western Australia. A girl used her wana (digging stick) to stop the other girls hitting a short stick placed on the ground. Players practise their throwing, catching and hitting skills. (This is a practice activity version of the game called ...

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Yulunga: kaidu babu

This is a popular water game that was observed being played at Mabuiag Island in the Torres Strait region, by Margaret Lawrie in the 1960s. This is an underwater swimming game. The object of the game is to see who can swim the longest distance underwater. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed ...

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Yulunga: ilye

A boomerang game was played by the Wogadj people of central Australia. This was a keep-away type of game that encouraged a lot of running. A boomerang was thrown along the ground in the game. The older men usually played against the younger men. The game is one of running and throwing using a disc (frisbee) in place of ...

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Yulunga: parndo

This ball game was played by Aboriginal people in the vicinity of Adelaide (Kaurna language) in South Australia. The parndo (ball) was made with a piece of possum skin and was fairly flat in shape. This is a game of kicking the ball high into the air and attempting to catch it. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games ...

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Yulunga: tha'an

The pushing game of tha’an, similar in nature to tug-of-war, was played by young and old men living on the upper reaches of the Batavia River and at McDonnell in north Queensland. The ‘fun’ of the activity consisted mainly in balancing the pushing pole against the side of the body for a few minutes and then letting it fall ...

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Yulunga: moka bandi

This guessing game was observed being played by young and old at Cape Bedford in north Queensland. It is a guessing game similar to ‘I spy’. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture by celebrating the games ...

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Yulunga: turi turi

In the northwest-central area of Queensland, the Maidhargari children made a type of skippingrope (turi turi) from the long roots of the Bauhinia (Queensland bean tree), or white-gum, which grew near the water’s edge. A vine rope was used in the same way by Wogadj children on the Daly River in the Northern Territory. This ...

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Yulunga: giriga

A duck ‘catching’ game was played by little boys and girls at Cape Bedford, Cooktown and the McIvor regions in north Queensland. This game was recorded by Walter Roth in the early 1900s. This is a role-play, running-and-chasing tag game suitable for younger children. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was ...

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Yulunga: Gitja

The Gitga (moon) play game from the north Queensland area was usually played when a number of children gathered together. The full version of the game observed involved imitation and acting aspects along with a running-and-chasing activity. This is a chasing-and-catching (tag) game. It is a simplified version of a more ...

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Yulunga: tabud nuri

A game of tag observed being played on Mabuiag Island in the Torres Strait by Margaret Lawrie. It is a group activity that is suitable for younger players. Players in a line coil and uncoil like a snake before a player is chased by other players, who attempt to touch (catch) him or her. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous ...

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Yulunga: thapumpan

The tag game of thapumpan (shark) was observed being played by little children at Cape Bedford in north Queensland. A chasing-and-tagging game. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding and appreciation of Indigenous culture by celebrating the ...

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Yulunga: mer kolap

This object-throwing game was observed being played in the Torres Strait on Mer Island in the nineteenth century. More recent versions have been observed. This version of an object-throwing game is a relay event. The Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games resource was developed to provide all Australians with a greater understanding ...

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Yulunga: wirrwuyu

As in various other cultures, stone skipping (throwing) along a surface of water was played by Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. On Dunk Island in Queensland, the throwing of cuttle-fish (krooghar) bones was observed. The bones were thrown along the surface of the water like ‘skipping stones’ and ...

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Yulunga: yiri

A spear game was recorded being played by the boys at Ulladulla in New South Wales. Small spears were thrown at pieces of wood, which were placed into running water. On Dunk Island in Queensland the boys used wood chips and pieces of bark floating on the water, or threw at small fish. This is a throwing-practice game played ...

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Yulunga: dhandang

Tree-climbing activities and climbing contests were widespread and helped to develop a skill of practical use. There were a variety of methods of climbing trees used in different parts of Australia. Some of these involved the use of vines or notches cut into trees. The Victoria River people in the Northern Territory arranged ...

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Yulunga: thepan

Large, heavy wooden swords were used by males in the rainforest areas of north Queensland, around Tully and neighbouring areas. These swords would be straight or slightly curved in shape. Swordplay was a popular ceremonial and recreational activity, and two contestants with a wooden sword and shield would compete. Each ...

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Yulunga: nandrra-rna

A small number of ‘marble’ type games (either traditional or introduced) were played in various parts of Australia. Gugada boys, living near Tarcoola in South Australia, used wooden marbles. The marbles placed in the ring were called kooka (meat) and the shooting marble was called kodji (spear). In the 1940s on Mer Island, ...